Coming Soon To A Presentation Near You

Friday, June 13th, 2014 by Simon Morton

Gadgets, gismos, and gimmicks always keep us on our toes.

Over the years we’ve seen so many examples of presenters who fall into the ‘all the gear and no idea’ category that our excitement about new tech always comes with a certain nervousness.

Almost every week a potential presentation tool hits the shelves and it can be quite exhausting trying to keep up.

So with the first half of 2014 drawing to a close I thought it would be a good time to catch up on some of the stuff that might make an appearance in presentations in the future.

We’re all more than familiar with touchscreen technology but some clever boffins at Fujitsu believe that when we interact this way we should be able to feel more than just a flat polished surface. A prototype of their Haptic Sensory Tablet was demonstrated at the Mobile World Congress in February and promises to deliver tactile interaction.

Obviously the screen itself does not physically change to create texture but ultrasonic vibration and high pressure air are cunningly used to trick your brain into interpreting slipperiness, bumpiness and roughness that corresponds to the onscreen image.

One reviewer has described it as like being ‘a bit like being gently zapped by a rural electric fence – in a good way’ but it’s worth remembering that this is still a prototype and when refined it could be an excellent way of bringing an extra sensory element to your presentations.

3D has been edging into tech all over the place (we recently delved into the presentation potential of 3D holograms) and the first part of the year has seen two further ways in which 3D might become useful to presenters.

The crowd funded Occipital Structure Sensor attaches to an iPad and you can scan your surroundings in 3D giving you a digital image that you can then edit and manipulate. I can see this working really well when demonstrating how new machinery would fit into an already existing plant room or how a new floor covering would actually look in a room. And while the ability to do this isn’t entirely new, having the power to do the whole thing in front of a customer could be a really great way of encouraging interaction by exploring and comparing options.

3D printing has also made the transition into the mass market with the MakerBot Replicator Mini compact 3D printer providing a ‘just about’ portable way of creating objects on the spot. Many presenters like to leave something physical behind after a meeting and it’s an effective way of staying in people’s minds. Leaving behind a 3D miniature of your product, that’s been created while you chat, might well be a little more memorable than a branded pen.

What all these things have in common (along with the smelly presentations that we explored a while ago) is that they offer a chance to communicate with your audience in new ways by involving senses traditionally ignored by presentations.

Innovations like these entice presenters to put style before substance, a trap into which many have fallen (and some are still waiting to be rescued).

We love experimenting with stuff here at Eyeful and we’ve been at the forefront of encouraging presenters to utilise multi format presentations (we call it Blended Presenting) but we’ve always balanced these recommendations with one huge caveat; understand your audience first.

To find out more about Blended Presenting and how it can help you get your message across you can check out page 168 of The Presentation Lab book or simply give us a ring and we’ll be happy to help you get it right.

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One Response to “Coming Soon To A Presentation Near You”

  1. […] unscientific straw poll during my seminar showed that the majority of businesses had tried new technology as part of their presentation […]

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