My Kingdom For a Phone….

Thursday, September 25th, 2014 by Simon Morton

My journey to work this morning was not particularly noteworthy, the weather was average, the traffic was average and none of the others drivers did anything worthy of even light swearing.

But about 30 minutes into my 40 minute commute it occurred to me that I might have left my mobile phone at home.

I don’t consider myself to be a technophile; I’m old enough to remember when you had to be in the room to see a TV programme that interested you (and there were only three channels to choose from). So I was a little nonplussed to find a panicky knot forming in my stomach at the very thought of a day without my phone, there was even a brief consideration of whether I had enough time to go back home and pick it up (despite the obvious answer being no). I eventually settled the uneasiness by convincing myself that ‘at home’ was OK – at least it wasn’t lost, or was it?*

What’s even more worrying is that I spend the whole day sitting at a desk that has on it a computer and a phone – meaning that there is literally nothing I need my mobile for.

But technology long ago passed through the era of addressing needs – now it’s all about addressing wants.

We don’t need to constantly know what the hundreds of random people (most of whom we’ve never met and never will meet) that we call ‘friends’ on social media are up to, but we certainly want to.

It seems that simply having access to technology compels us access technology.

So what’s going on? Is it obsession, addiction, dependency or something altogether more (or indeed less) sinister?

A recent experiment involved 163 students giving up their mobile phones for an hour and taking a series of anxiety tests to find out if they were affected by the deprivation.

Apparently it transpires that even those of us who don’t manage to use our phones 25 hours a day (a figure arrived at by double counting the time we’re using it for more than one thing) will suffer some level of separation anxiety.

We’ve talked before about how hard it can be to engage an audience, discussed ways of turning surreptitious phone checking to your advantage and looked at whether wearable tech will have an impact on presenters and audiences. But now it seems we’ve got far more to worry about than we thought.

Talk of creating technology free zones is already stirring up the kind of angry, civil liberty, personal freedom, type responses more often seen in relation to huge social, political and legislative change but in reality trying to enforce anything is getting harder by the day.

Twenty years ago you could have asked people to turn off their pagers, ten years ago turning off phones would have done it and five years ago it would have been phones and tablets. Today you might need to ask people to relinquish phones, tablets, glasses and smartwatches to get close to the same effect. Five years from now implantable tech might just make the whole thing completely impossible.

It doesn’t matter what you think about our reliance on technology the important thing is acknowledging that it exists and understanding how to overcome the challenges and maximise the opportunities.

We talk about how Blended Presenting can help increase audience engagement and encourage interaction but maybe soon we’ll have to start thinking more deeply about Blended Spectating to make sure our stories can be heard above the constant stream of outside information.

Whatever the future of Audience Engagement you can be sure that Eyeful will be there, innovating to our hearts content and making sure that our customers are one step ahead of their competition.

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*for any of you still bothered about the whereabouts of my phone please don’t worry my husband emailed me to say I’d left it on the kitchen table and he’s put it in the cupboard above the oven (?) just in case I get home before him!

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